Faculty Story: Jack Bookman, Mathematics

Faculty Story: Jack Bookman, Mathematics

From 1982-2012, I was a contingent faculty member at Duke University holding, at one time or another, all ranks from Instructor to Professor of the Practice. I strongly support the current effort to unionize non-tenure track faculty at Duke. While conditions for POPs at Duke have improved over the last 10 or so years, conditions for other non-tenure faculty (“tenuous” faculty, as a colleague of mine called himself) do not seem to have improved at all. POPs and, to a larger extent, other non-TT faculty …

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Faculty Story: Rann Bar-On, Mathematics

Faculty Story: Rann Bar-On, Mathematics

I have been at Duke since 2003, first as a PhD student, and now as teaching faculty. In all those years, it has been an honor to pursue my passion for teaching mathematics to bright, ambitious undergraduates from extremely diverse backgrounds.

As a lecturer in the Mathematics Department, I have been treated relatively well at Duke: I am paid enough to consider buying a house and raising a family in it, I have a five year contract, and I have been sponsored for an employment-based Green …

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Durham city leaders are standing with Duke faculty

Durham city leaders are standing with Duke faculty

As we move closer to forming our union, we are proud to have the support of Durham city leaders. Check out these statements of support. For more on community support for our organizing, go to OurDuke.org.

Jillian Johnson, Durham City Council and Duke Alumna

“I’m so happy to have the opportunity to support the growing faculty union at my alma mater, Duke University. Duke and Durham have a critical relationship, and what happens at Duke impacts so many of Durham’s families. I’m excited for this opportunity for faculty …

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Why is Duke paying female faculty less?

Why is Duke paying female faculty less?

Across the country, female faculty at 4-year private colleges earn up to 14% less than their male counterparts.1

At Duke, female faculty receive lower pay than their male counterparts, at rates that exceed the national average.

Across job titles, from lecturer to full professor, the salary disadvantage at Duke is up to 26% less. For full-time female faculty, this means only 74 cents on the dollar.

Since faculty salary data is only available for full-time faculty, it’s likely that data on part-time faculty salaries would reveal an even higher overall …

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Take the Duke Faculty Survey

Take the Duke Faculty Survey

As non-tenure track faculty at Duke, we care deeply about our university, our students, and our disciplines. But we know from a survey released last semester that we lack the voice, respect, and transparency that we need. Among the results of the survey:

Only 3% of respondents felt that decision-making procedures at Duke are clear and transparent;
70% of respondents reported that Duke does not provide an opportunity for all faculty to have a voice in decisions made at our university;
67% felt that the senior leadership of …

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Faculty Story: Carol Apollonio, Slavic and Eurasian Studies

Faculty Story: Carol Apollonio, Slavic and Eurasian Studies

I‘ve taught at Duke for over thirty years, first in the invisible ranks, and then (beginning in the late 1980s) as one of the very first crop of Professors of the Practice. I’m proud to place teaching at the center of my mission, though I am also a recognized senior scholar and citizen in my field. At Duke, I contribute passionately in every imaginable area of undergraduate life, in faculty governance, and in many other capacities. This long service testifies to my devotion to the …

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FAQ: What have others achieved by forming a union?

FAQ: What have others achieved by forming a union?

Across the country, faculty have negotiated contracts that have won pay increases, the establishment or expansion of professional development funds, “just cause” clauses protecting members from arbitrary discipline or discharge, a defined rate of compensation in the event of course cancellation, among other improvements. Because this is our union, what we achieve in bargaining will reflect our priorities and issues specific to Duke University. Most importantly, forming a union will allow us to have a voice in determining our working conditions.

Read more questions and answers …

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Faculty Story: Andrea Scapolo, Italian

Faculty Story: Andrea Scapolo, Italian

Since 2010, I’ve worked at Duke as a non-tenure track faculty member. I consider myself blessed to teach Italian language and culture to bright and committed students, and I’m proud to collaborate with some of the finest faculty in the country.

I decided to join Duke Teaching First in order to protect and improve the quality of teaching and learning for my students. I’m concerned about the future of higher education in our country, and I know that we can only turn it around it we …

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FAQ: Why are Duke faculty forming a union?

FAQ: Why are Duke faculty forming a union?

Why are we forming a union?

Because we want to improve our working conditions and make sure teaching and scholarship are the priority at Duke. With our union, we will have a stronger, more unified voice for our profession. More than 40% of Duke faculty are off the tenure track. While we love teaching at Duke, there’s room for and access to professional development funds to keep up with advances in the field. We believe strongly that creating more equitable and predictable employment conditions for non-tenure track …

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Faculty diversity: An argument for a faculty union

Faculty diversity: An argument for a faculty union

What does faculty diversity have to do with our effort to form a union?

Zoe Willingham, a Trinity junior and the President of Duke United Students Against Sweatshops, explains in the Chronicle:

“[P]rofessors of color are more likely to be underpaid and experience job insecurity at Duke. Minority professors are more likely to be contingent faculty, non-tenure-track faculty that work without benefits or long term employment contracts. 54 percent of Hispanic faculty, 54 percent of Asian faculty and 52 percent of African American faculty are non-tenure track, …

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